Condominium Law

For Condo Buyers and Owners For Condo Board Members

 

For Potential Condo Buyers and Owners

A guide to commonly used condominium terms in Alberta for anyone interested in buying a condo or currently living in one

Last updated: September 2016
Information about condo finances for Albertans interested in buying a condo. Booklet features an overview of what documents to request and what to look for in the reserve fund documents, annual report, operating budget, financial statements, estoppel certificate, and meeting minutes.

Last updated: September 2016
Developers in Alberta are legally required to provide condo buyers with a number of documents before they sign on the dotted line.

Last updated: September 2016
A list of documents you should request and review before you buy a resale condominium.

Last updated: September 2016
Six things you need to know before you rent out your condominium.

Last updated: September 2016

 

For Condominium Board Members

If you are a board member for the first time, here is a checklist and some tips to help you in your new role.

Last updated: September 2016
Board members must follow standards of conduct in running the condominium corporation.
There can be severe consequences if board members do not follow these standards.

Last updated: September 2016
Bylaws are rules that govern the condominium corporation. The bylaws bind both the condominium corporation and owners. Anyone renting or visiting the condominium must also comply with the bylaws.

Last updated: September 2016
As part of their duties under the Condominium Property Act, condo board members have the power to enforce the condominium corporation’s bylaws. Here are some steps that a condo board can take if the bylaws are not followed.

Last updated: September 2016
If a condominium is self-managed, the condo board is responsible for managing all day to day aspects of the property.

Last updated: September 2016
Many condominium corporations will hire a condo manager to look after the day-to-day affairs of the condominium complex. Here are some tips if you are hiring and working with a condo manager

Last updated: September 2016
Condominium contributions (also known as condo fees), special assessments, and reserve funds are different. Condo board members need to understand how they differ.

Last updated: September 2016
Condominium corporations may need to provide certain documents to a unit owner or third parties (such as a unit purchaser or mortgagee).

Last updated: September 2016
In Alberta, all condominium corporations must establish and maintain a reserve fund to cover the costs of major repair and replacement of its property. To determine how much money a condominium corporation should have in its reserve fund, it must complete a reserve fund study, report, and plan every 5 years.

Last updated: September 2016
Condo boards have no specific dispute resolution mechanisms. The following general dispute resolution tips are useful, but are not a substitute for legal advice. It is recommended that condo boards seek legal advice if they have a dispute

Last updated: September 2016
A condominium board of directors (known as the board) is a group of individuals. They are normally elected each year by unit owners to run the condominium corporation.

Last updated: September 2016
Condominiums have 3 key meetings – board meetings, Annual General Meeting (AGM), and extraordinary general meetings.

Last updated: September 2016
A condominium corporation has a legal obligation to respond to requests for certain information, depending on what is requested and who makes the request.

Last updated: September 2016
Condominium boards should know that the Condominium Property Act (CPA) addresses the rental process, including what happens before, during, and after a tenancy.

Last updated: September 2016

The development of these resources was made possible through a grant from the