Being an Attorney Under an Enduring Power of Attorney

Being an Attorney under an Enduring Power of Attorney

Being an Attorney Under an Enduring Power of Attorney

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This booklet is for Albertans who have been asked to be an Attorney under someone’s Enduring Power of Attorney (EPA). It explains what is involved in being an Attorney. It is divided into four sections: a question and answer section touching on issues to consider before you accept the job; a checklist section that helps guide you when the Donor – the person who gave you Power of Attorney – loses capacity; a glossary of common terms; and further resources. If you need more detailed help or legal advice, see Being an Attorney under an Enduring Power of Attorney – Where Can I Get More Help.

Table of contents

Please note that in this booklet, the term “Attorney” refers to an Attorney appointed under an Enduring Power of Attorney that is designed to be in effect even after the person who created it loses mental capacity. There is another type of Power of Attorney called a non-enduring or limited or ordinary Power of Attorney that does not have this feature. If you are an Attorney under a non-enduring Power of Attorney, please see our booklet titled “Powers of Attorney”.

You should NOT rely on this webpage for legal advice. It provides general information on Alberta law only. December 2016.
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